Thursday, September 15, 2011 Friday, April 29, 2011
I can so relate to this….

I can so relate to this….

lingllama:

[Picture: Background: 8-piece pie-style color split with alternating shades of blue. Foreground: Linguist Llama meme, a white llama facing forward, wearing a red scarf. Top text: “ Friend makes glaring grammar ‘error’ ” Bottom text: “ Struggle to resist the dark side—prescriptivism ”]

Story of my life.

lingllama:

[Picture: Background: 8-piece pie-style color split with alternating shades of blue. Foreground: Linguist Llama meme, a white llama facing forward, wearing a red scarf. Top text: “ Friend makes glaring grammar ‘error’ ” Bottom text: “ Struggle to resist the dark side—prescriptivism ”]

Story of my life.

Monday, January 17, 2011 Friday, December 10, 2010

The Linguists - We Are the World (via TLPdiak)

Kudos to these Hungarian linguists!

Monday, August 30, 2010
…research can be a great deal of fun and an intellectually highly satifying activity. Many people enjoy doing corsswords and puzzles, and it is helpful to look at research at something similar but on a large scale. …research is not something that can only be done well if we are ready to sacrifice a great deal of our working lives and thus ‘pay the price’. (Many applied linguists actually enjoy life!) Zoltan Dornyei (2007). Research Methods in Applied Linguistics.
Saturday, June 26, 2010
tristn:

heh*

I got this ad too. And I wugged it.

tristn:

heh*

I got this ad too. And I wugged it.

Monday, June 21, 2010

If you can correctly pronounce every word in this poem, you will be speaking English better than 90% of the native English speakers in the world. After trying the verses, a Frenchman said he’d prefer six months of hard labour to reading six lines aloud. Try them yourself.

rococonokokoro:

coven:

Dearest creature in creation, Study English pronunciation.

Read More

(via lovelywings)

Haha, oh, that’s hard! But I got them all…. stupid English language, though. It’s funny that we don’t really think of it as difficult, like we would think of Chinese or, I dunno, Arabic? (What DO Americans think of as hard language?)

OKAY. A few things from a linguistic lover…

Not that I knew all the words and could pronounce them correctly, but it was not that hard. It is hard for me to pronounce it “correctly” because I have Japanese accents, but I know they don’t sound the same even though they are written similarly.

My question is, though, “what is the CORRECT pronunciation?” Putting aside second language speakers (because this will make things messy), every native speaker has accents. We can set up a standard accent though, what should be standard in America? English in Washington D.C. because it’s the capital? (Lots of countries state their standard language as their language spoken in the capital). New York because it’s a big city? Does it mean everyone who does not speak the “standard accent” is considered as incorrect speakers?

Also, this is just a matter of orthography. English has deep orthography. The spelling does not tell us everything about the pronunciation. It’s hard for the speakers of language with shallow/transparent orthography like French, Spanish, Italian, Korean, etc. Chinese also has deep orthography. Arabic has relatively shallower orthography, but their alphabets are different from Latin alphabet and that is why it feels like it is a hard language (which means Chinese is twice as hard as English to read for speakers of, for example, Spanish). I learned Hebrew and Korean alphabet in a few hours, it is not really hard just to read once you figure it out. Note that I am just talking about “reading” here, not about learning the language per se.

Finally, not any language is essentially stupid, weird, or crazy (well, maybe crazy in an intriguing way!), although they might seem bizarre for the speakers of other languages. Or, we can say, that every language is crazy because they are all so unique.

Okay, too much linguistic ranting :) I am not blaming you, rococonokokoro, and I don’t deny this poem is interesting. But I just could not overlook a few things.

Monday, May 31, 2010 Wednesday, May 26, 2010

Words wholly related: sit and set

tristn:

loscheiner:

Tristan and I were nerding out- (as we often do- and the topic turned - as it often does- to language.  Specifically, we were talking about the semantics of verbs.  I asked him what he knew about verbs that seem to come in transitive/intransitive pairs and are phonologically similar, like sit/set and lay/lie.

My theory was that the these pairs originally had one root and that the vowel was ablauted depending on whether the form was transitive (requires an object) or intransitive (doesn’t require an object).  So (intransitive) “I sit myself down” but (transitive) “I set down a glass”.  

Tristan was skeptical.  He did some digging and turned up that they had separate roots.  At each level (Old English, Old High German, Teutonic) the verbs were represented separately but analogously- meaning that the ablaut goes way back.  But there, buried in the Teutonic, it seems like “set” is defined as “the causal of to sit”.  AHA.

Sit: [Common Teut.: OE. sittan (sæts{aeacu}ton{asg}eseten), = OFris. sitta (WFris. sitte), MDu. sittenzitten (Du. zitten), OS. sittiansittean (MLG. and LG.sitten), OHG. sizzansizzen (G. sitzen), ON. and Icel. sitja (Norw. sitjasittasita; MSw. sitiasittia, Sw. sitta; Da. sidde):{em}Teut. type *sitjan, for which Goth. had sitan. The stem *set-, pre-Teut. *sed-, is widely represented in the cognate languages, as in Lith. sedeti, Lat. sed{emac}re, Gr. {easperacu}{zeta}{epsilon}{sigma}{theta}{alpha}{iota} (cf. {easperacu}{delta}{omicron}{fsigma} seat), etc. 

Set: [Com. Teut.: OE. s{ehook}ttan = OFris. setta (mod.Fris. sette), OS. settian (MDu., MLG. setten, Du. zetten), OHG. sezzan beside sazzan (MHG. sezzen, G. setzen), ON. setja (Sw. satta, Da. sætte), Goth. satjan; causal of *setjan (sitjan) to SIT

tristan: hey this is a really funny etymology: set O.E. settan “cause to sit, put in some place, fix firmly”. sit O.E. sittan “to be seated, to seat oneself”.
lolo
:
what makes you think that’s funny?

oh snap

It indeed is funny.

Friday, May 21, 2010 Tuesday, April 13, 2010
Facebook | Photos from LOLphonology
ALIGN (Tummy, R, Fuzzy, L)

Facebook | Photos from LOLphonology

ALIGN (Tummy, R, Fuzzy, L)

Thursday, March 18, 2010

Patty/Paddy

f00tnotes:

noxyxxx:

  • St. Patrick’s Day
  • St. Patty’s Day
  • St. Paddy’s Day

I have seen these variations on how to call the day. My friend suggested that “Paddy” is due to intervocalic alveolar flapping seen in American English (and Australian English?). Indeed, so far as I seen, only American and Australian residents use “St. Paddy’s day”. It’s interesting how people started to use the “d” orthography instead of “t” when they pronounce “Patty” and “Paddy” the same.

Also, I found it interesting that “St. Patrick’s Day” is “Lá Fhéile Pádraig” in Irish Gaelic. Do we see something phonological here too? Is “Paddy” also related to “Pádraig”? I am curious about the phonology of Irish Gaelic and also English variety in Ireland.

Ireland. I really wanna go there some day.

I love your thinking. Maybe the /d/ is just the normal way for this reflex to surface in Irish. I’m not highly versed in Irish phonology. Highly interested, yes. It’s a shame my department focus primarily on older and southern-er languages (Mycenean Greek, Hittite, Sanskrit, etc.). I’d love a course on Irish poetics or Irish phonology. *sigh*

Also Ireland. Such a beautiful place! :)

Thanks :)

Another friend told me that “Paddy” actually is pretty commonly accepted in the UK/Ireland but they do not really like the form “Patty”. The flapping in American English sorta explains why we have both Paddy/Patty as they sound the same (whether they realize it or not), but there still remain the question why “Paddy” is more accepted than “Patty” in the motherland of this holiday.

I love learning older languages! It gives us historical insight into languages. But Irish must be a very interesting language to learn; it is pretty different from other European languages too. I really hope the country would maintain their original language as long as possible - I have heard it is increasingly being replaced with English, which is not hard to imagine.

Wednesday, March 17, 2010

Patty/Paddy

  • St. Patrick’s Day
  • St. Patty’s Day
  • St. Paddy’s Day

I have seen these variations on how to call the day. My friend suggested that “Paddy” is due to intervocalic alveolar flapping seen in American English (and Australian English?). Indeed, so far as I seen, only American and Australian residents use “St. Paddy’s day”. It’s interesting how people started to use the “d” orthography instead of “t” when they pronounce “Patty” and “Paddy” the same.

Also, I found it interesting that “St. Patrick’s Day” is “Lá Fhéile Pádraig” in Irish Gaelic. Do we see something phonological here too? Is “Paddy” also related to “Pádraig”? I am curious about the phonology of Irish Gaelic and also English variety in Ireland.

Ireland. I really wanna go there some day.

Saturday, February 13, 2010
kreol genisis
we studiez it

kreol genisis

we studiez it